• 'Imaging Blackness' brings together some of the most exciting Black photographers working today. Photography and the way Blackness Is captured...


    Aindrea Emelife is an acclaimed curator, art critic and art historian from London. Starting at The Courtauld Institute of Art, where she completed a BA in History of Art, she has quickly gone on to become a ground-breaking new voice in the art world, delivering talks and l ectures at UNESCO, The Times, the Courtauld Institute of Art and the Victoria and Albert Museum, amongst others.

    'Imaging Blackness' brings together some of the most exciting Black photographers working today. Photography and the way Blackness Is captured by the camera has always been integral to the Black experience.

     

    Black photography by Black photographers has fundamentally been overlooked by art and the media; unwilling or unable to grasp the power and its essence. But it has not deterred; rather, it inspired proactivity. African-Americas’ engagement with photography in the 19th Century kickstarted a tradition for Black photographers’ use of photography today to promote social change and challenge the representation of Blackness historically with powerful imagery that redefines the beauty, resilience, and multiplicity of the Black experience. 

     

    When African-Americans were reconciling the painful aftermath of enslavement and forging a new future fighting for equal rights, photography was embraced by African-Americans during this period, as it was a means for them to reshape the narrative. Photography is particularly important when we consider that who wields the camera is in control and is given the chance to shape not only their own image but that of their community. With the camera, Black photographers and the Black subject could, and continues to challenge racist stereotypes and portray Black communities as they are and as they aspire to be.

     

  • Taking up space is resistance. Frederick Douglass, the African-American abolitionist leader, is an important example of how the Black image can be revolutionary. Indeed, it is difficult to imagine a more remarkable story of self-determination and advancement than the life of Frederick Douglass. After escaping slavery in Maryland, he became one of the most famous intellectuals of his time, advising presidents and lecturing to thousands on a range of causes including women's rights and Irish home rule. He is also best known for his use of photography as a political and social tool, as he set out to make himself the most photographed man of the 19th Century, surpassing even Abraham Lincoln.

    Douglass, discussing the accessibility of photography, mused that “What was once the special and exclusive luxury of the rich and great now is the privilege of all. The humblest servant girl may now possess a picture of herself such as the wealth of kings could not purchase fifty years ago”. Douglass sought to show the many variations of Black subjectivity and in doing so manifested the groundbreaking idea of visual Black plurality and a broader representation of Black life. 
    In a similar vein, a century later, Mary Church Terrell, daughter of former slaves and national leader for civil rights and womens suffrage, followed suit and distributed images of herself that sought to rupture the preconceptions of Blackness, challenging who society expected them to be. 

  • The development of Black photography studies enabled communities even greater control of the way photographs were styled and staged so they could more authentically reflect Black life. The first Black-owned photography studio was established in Detroit in 1915 by Harvey C Jackson, who collaborated with communities to create cinematic scenes of important events. Posing for a photograph was an empowering act; it remains so. It served as a way to counteract caricatures that distorted facial features and mocked Black society instead demonstrating dignity in the Black experience. Now, photographers further this by boldly reclaiming the multiplicity of the Black experience and pushing the mission further.


    Blackness is not a monolith; this exhibition shines light on the many aspects of Blackness. Colourism, diaspora, queerness and cultural heritage are explored by the camera with powerful rage, beauty and celebration. We are in the midst of a powerful new generation of Black photographers, transcending limitations and reflecting Blackness beyond limits and into the realms of which we did not know possible. With strength, grace, and power – Imaging Blackness is an immersion into the culturally rich worlds of these new trailblazers. 

     

    - Aindrea Emelife, Curator

  • Thandiwe Muriu

    Thandiwe Muriu

    Over the years, Thandiwe has developed a particular interest in showcasing Africa’s unique mix of vibrant cultures, colour and people. In her CAMO series, she celebrates her African heritage and tackles important social issues such as identity and self-perception using the rich colours and vibrancy the continent is so well know for.

     

    The title of the series CAMO, is a play on how the subject of each image camouflages into the background - a commentary on how easy it is for the individual to lose their identity to culture. Initially the series began as a way to appreciate African textiles and beauty, but grew to focus on exploring the African identity and what makes each individual uniquely beautiful. The textiles in the images act as a backdrop on which the Artist celebrates her culture.

  •  

    • Thandiwe Muriu Camo 25, 2021 Jet Ink Print of FineArt TAG + MATT 310g 90 cm x 60 cm
      Thandiwe Muriu
      Camo 25, 2021
      Jet Ink Print of FineArt TAG + MATT 310g
      90 cm x 60 cm
    • Thandiwe Muriu Camo 26, 2021 Jet Ink Print of FineArt TAG + MATT 310g 90 cm x 60 cm
      Thandiwe Muriu
      Camo 26, 2021
      Jet Ink Print of FineArt TAG + MATT 310g
      90 cm x 60 cm
  • Adrian Octavius Walker

    Adrian Octavius Walker

    Adrian Octavius Walker is a mixed-media artist based in Chicago, IL, by way of St. Louis, MO. His work is inspired by the Black body, dynamics of the Black family and archival work related to the African American experience and the untold stories they share. Working in both film and digital-format photography, Walker creates penetrating portraits influenced by his deep awareness of the nuances that pervade the human experience.  His greatest milestone to date is being one of the prize-winning artists in The Outwin: American Portraiture Today at the National Portrait Gallery Smithsonian in Washington, D.C with his series 'We Matter', featuring portraits of Black men wearing various colours of velvet durags. The portraits are soft, stylized and empowering, breaking the stereotypes of Black masculinity often presented in popular media with bold, poppy and pastel colours. 

  • "The title “We Matter” is about us as black people. I was thinking about black men and how much we do matter, even to those who don’t think we do. I want them to know that we do. No matter how we look. We matter in all settings. If we’re in a jail cell, we still matter. We matter in a classroom. We matter all over. And we can appear in places like the National Portrait Gallery. I can tell my daughter, when she’s old enough to understand one day, that there was a Black man in a durag hanging up on those walls, two rooms from President Obama’s portrait. That sh*t crazy." - Adrian Octavius Walker

    • Adrian Octavius Walker Breathe, 2018 Archival Pigment Print Wood Frame 76.2 cm x 50.8 cm
      Adrian Octavius Walker
      Breathe, 2018
      Archival Pigment Print Wood Frame
      76.2 cm x 50.8 cm
    • Adrian Octavius Walker Loose Ties, 2018 Archival Pigment Print Wood Frame 101.6 cm x 27 cm
      Adrian Octavius Walker
      Loose Ties, 2018
      Archival Pigment Print Wood Frame
      101.6 cm x 27 cm
    • Adrian Octavius Walker Rest, 2018 Archival Pigment Print Wood Frame 34.29 cm x 50.8 cm
      Adrian Octavius Walker
      Rest, 2018
      Archival Pigment Print Wood Frame
      34.29 cm x 50.8 cm
    • Adrian Octavius Walker We Matter, 2018 Archival Pigment Print Wood Frame 101.6 cm x 68.58 cm
      Adrian Octavius Walker
      We Matter, 2018
      Archival Pigment Print Wood Frame
      101.6 cm x 68.58 cm
  • Aïcha Fall Nadaud

    Aïcha Fall Nadaud

    Aïcha Fall Nadaud  is an Ivorian and French self-taught photographer whose practice explores and forges links between her personal identity and culture. Her art practice uses photography and sculpture to explore stories about femininity, beauty, representation, and celebration of Black bodies. Fall harnesses the narrative power of photography in order to inspire her audiences through a demonstration of the medium’s ability to affect change in the world. As both an African woman and a graduate in African studies, Fall embraces the responsibility of representing her continent, heritage, and community.

    "'A Seat at the Table' is a study on the body; a fantastic visual tale. It’s also an invitation to another dimension. Bare torso, elegant gesture, almost dancing,  Telepathic, mimicking by one touch or one bite, I wanted to narrate black bodies capable of doing wonders, or just black bodies existing simply and beautifully. I  wanted to create my very own tale where everything is possible."

     

    • Aicha Fall Nadaud Mimicry’s Thearter : In Flow, 2020 Giclee print 80 cm x 60 cm
      Aicha Fall Nadaud
      Mimicry’s Thearter : In Flow, 2020
      Giclee print
      80 cm x 60 cm
    • Aicha Fall Nadaud Mimicry’s Thearter : Satisfaction, 2020 Giclee print 80 cm x 60 cm
      Aicha Fall Nadaud
      Mimicry’s Thearter : Satisfaction, 2020
      Giclee print
      80 cm x 60 cm
    • Aicha Fall Nadaud Bopp du ngir Karaw Kesse I, 2021 Giclee Print 80 cm x 60 cm
      Aicha Fall Nadaud
      Bopp du ngir Karaw Kesse I, 2021
      Giclee Print
      80 cm x 60 cm
    • Aicha Fall Nadaud Bopp du ngir Karaw Kesse II, 2021 Giclee Print 80 cm x 60 cm
      Aicha Fall Nadaud
      Bopp du ngir Karaw Kesse II, 2021
      Giclee Print
      80 cm x 60 cm
  • Bevan Agyemang

    Bevan Agyemang

    Bevan Agyemang is a London-based visual artist and designer, originally from Ghana. Agyemang uses different mediums within his work, which is centred around the layers of constructed identity, and rooted in his interests in cultural studies and anthropology. Beginning as a street photographer, Agyemang studied our natural human behaviours and how we make sense of the world around us. He began to depict himself as characters who were influenced by a combination of his parents' old photographs from the 60's through to the 80's and his immediate environment at the time.

    By using his own body to communicate these stories, his works are grounded in his own personal exploration of his parents' diasporic journey, African history and the construct of identity. A
    gyemang's work across the fashion landscape is powered by his documentary approach and the local community. Engaging with his local environment and taking the time to have genuine conversations with the people within it are key. 

    • Bevan Agyemang Omniscience, 2021 Fuji Crystal Archive Paper 109 cm x 72 cm
      Bevan Agyemang
      Omniscience, 2021
      Fuji Crystal Archive Paper
      109 cm x 72 cm
    • Bevan Agyemang Omnipresent, 2021 Fuji Crystal Arhive Paper 109 cm x 72 cm
      Bevan Agyemang
      Omnipresent, 2021
      Fuji Crystal Arhive Paper
      109 cm x 72 cm
    • Bevan Agyemang Omnipotent, 2021 Fuji Crystal Archive Paper 109 cm x 72 cm
      Bevan Agyemang
      Omnipotent, 2021
      Fuji Crystal Archive Paper
      109 cm x 72 cm
  • Delphine Diallo

    Delphine Diallo

    Delphine Diallo is a Brooklyn-based French and Senegalese visual artist and photographer. Sought to challenge the norms of our society, Diallo immerses herself in the realm of anthropology, mythology, religion, science and martial arts to release her mind. Her work takes her to far remote areas, as she insists on spending intimate time with her subjects to better represent their most innate energy. “I treat my process as if it were an adventure, liberating a new protagonist” — Diallo’s powerful portraitures unmask and stir an uninhibited insight that allows her audience to see beyond the facade. “We are in constant search for wonder and growth. I see art as a vessel to express consciousness and an access to diffuse wisdom, enlightenment, fear, beauty, ugliness, mystery, faith, strength, fearless, universal matter”.

    • Delphine Diallo God is a Woman - Ekonda Botolo/Congo, 2020 Pigment inkjet on archival paper 75 cm x 50 cm
      Delphine Diallo
      God is a Woman - Ekonda Botolo/Congo, 2020
      Pigment inkjet on archival paper
      75 cm x 50 cm
  • "My intention is to change the gaze in photography, create a new narrative to empower black women and create new experiences for consciousness to expand. Women are in need for different kinds of narrative. The woman's body should be one of the most respectable places on earth. Without her, we will not be born, nor either feeling unconditional love. So many black women who have been abused, disrespected, betrayed understand the power of healing because they had no other choice to carry on with life. For centuries, the Patriarchal society transformed the black woman body as an object. I want to bring a great new vision of black female archetypes: the explorer, the queen, the goddess, the innocent, the sage, the mother, the caregiver, the ruler, the lover, the spiritual warrior, the magician, the everywoman, so many others. It is the birth of the divine feminine within me (and within all of us ) that comes through our families and ancestors, an energy which was once oppressed." - Delphine Diallo 

  • Djibril Drame

    Djibril Drame

    Djibril Drame is a Senegalese visual artist, filmmaker, curator and independent scholar who strives to shed light on socially relevant and slightly controversial issues affecting our world today.  His work reflects the many aspects of Africa’s multifaceted history and innumerable intertwined cultures, offering an alternative African narrative. In the past few years, Drame has also been heavily involved in film and has released two short movies which have gone on to feature in festivals and art tours internationally. Commonly known amongst his peers as 'Gadaay/ GodEye', Drame seeks to portray communities around the world through his photographic lens, to provide insights into worlds that are often unseen and overlooked. 

     

     

    • Djibril Drame Le jeune Noir à l épée series, Frank Ocean, 2021 Giclee print 114.3 cm x 76.2 cm
      Djibril Drame
      Le jeune Noir à l épée series, Frank Ocean, 2021
      Giclee print
      114.3 cm x 76.2 cm
    • Djibril Drame Le jeune Noir à l épée series, Quiétude, 2021 Giclee print 114.3 cm x 76.2 cm
      Djibril Drame
      Le jeune Noir à l épée series, Quiétude, 2021
      Giclee print
      114.3 cm x 76.2 cm
  • Joel Palmer

    Joel Palmer

    Joel Palmer is a British POC and a proud member of the LGBTQ+ community, who specialises in photography, creative direction, movement and styling, all of which has been influenced by his years spent training in the performing arts. Palmer’s work and artistic output is dedicated to raising awareness and amplifying the voices of POC and LGBTQ+ artists in fashion, film, music and performance, always aiming to produce visuals that inspire by blending extreme beauty with raw humanity. Palmer's surreal and otherworldy images convey universal themes of freedom, empowerment and inner strength - at the heart of which lies his interest in the role that the photographer plays during pivotal moments in history and culture.  

    Palmer has previously stated that much of his work, like the pieces shown in this exhibition, are a direct response to the negative portrayals of POC and LGBTQ+ people which are so rife in the media. He aims to combat this by portraying his communities in a positive light, showcasing humanity and identity and inspiring members of those communities to be proud of who they are.

     

    • Joel Palmer Club Renaissance Silk Rag 66.2 cm x 118.9 cm
      Joel Palmer
      Club Renaissance
      Silk Rag
      66.2 cm x 118.9 cm
    • Joel Palmer Power C-Type Fuji Gloss 59.4 cm x 84.1 cm
      Joel Palmer
      Power
      C-Type Fuji Gloss
      59.4 cm x 84.1 cm
  • Yannis Davy Guibinga

    Yannis Davy Guibinga

     

    Yannis Davy Guibinga is a photographer from Libreville,  Gabon currently based in Montréal, Canada. In order to contribute to a  change in the narrative about the continent, Yannis Davy Guibinga has found in photography a strength and a tool allowing him to not only celebrate but  also to document and represent the many cultures and identities on the  African continent and its diaspora.  

     


    Yannis has worked with clients such as Apple, Nikon & Adobe and has  exhibited works internationally in England, South Africa, Nigeria, France,  Russia, Qatar, Switzerland and more, as well as featured on platforms such as  CNN Africa, Document Journal, I-D, Harper’s Bazaar Russia, Condé Nast  Traveler and more.

     

     

     

    • Yannis Guibinga Silicone Sunset I, 2020 Giclee print 76.2 cm x 50.8 cm
      Yannis Guibinga
      Silicone Sunset I, 2020
      Giclee print
      76.2 cm x 50.8 cm
    • Yannis Guibinga Silicone Sunset II, 2020 Giclee print 76.2 cm x 50.8 cm
      Yannis Guibinga
      Silicone Sunset II, 2020
      Giclee print
      76.2 cm x 50.8 cm
  • Yannis Guibinga, Silicone Sunset III, 2020

    Yannis Guibinga

    Silicone Sunset III, 2020 Giclee print

    76.2 cm x 50.8 cm
  • John Baloyi

    John Baloyi

    John Baloyi is a photographer and visual artist based in Johannesburg. Baloyi’s work as a photographer began in 2017 when he left his secular employment as an Automotive Electrician. He began by assisting a variety of photographers in order to familiarise himself with the industry, which led to him shooting commercial work for various brands and campaigns. Baloyi's work seeks to document the unique experience of Black people through surreal and Afrocentric lens with the intention to portray people of colour as works of art. His themes aim to evoke an alternative view of people of colour to educate and change the subjects' perspective of themselves.


    Since picking up a camera, Baloyi has collaborated with an array of brands such as Adidas, Adobe, Levi's and Bombay Sapphire. 

     

    • John Baloyi Lukhanyiso, 2021 Fine Art Silk Rag 59.5 cm x 42 cm
      John Baloyi
      Lukhanyiso, 2021
      Fine Art Silk Rag
      59.5 cm x 42 cm
    • John Baloyi Orariloe, 2021 Fine Art Silk Rag 59.5 cm x 42 cm
      John Baloyi
      Orariloe, 2021
      Fine Art Silk Rag
      59.5 cm x 42 cm
    • John Baloyi Phelisa, 2021 Fine Art Silk Rag 59.5 cm x 42 cm
      John Baloyi
      Phelisa, 2021
      Fine Art Silk Rag
      59.5 cm x 42 cm
  • Kenny Germé

    Kenny Germé

    Kenny Germé is a photographer born in Martinique and based in Paris. Kenny refers to himself as a ‘visual storyteller’, drawing inspiration from his Carribean roots as well as punk, jazz, and hip hop culture. “I don’t consider myself to be a fashion photographer - it is just the medium that I like to use. Over everything else, I am a storyteller,” he says, adding: “As a community we are so saturated with images and so, for me, it is important to create emotion, composition and narrative within the images I take and not participate in the mass of thoughtless pictures being captured everyday with your phone.” 

     

    On the Godfather series, Kenny says, "For me this picture is the presentation of the new protégé. Showing to the world the new Godson, the Godfather to become. He is wrapped up in this sort of blanket like a new born baby, still fragile and to protect, but still very strong, like a messiah. It represents our fragile future that we should look upon in order to be bright and positive, it has a lot to offer but we shouldn’t spoil it."

     

    • Kenny Germé The Godfather I , 2020 Hahnemühle FineArt Baryta 84.1 cm x 59.4 cm
      Kenny Germé
      The Godfather I , 2020
      Hahnemühle FineArt Baryta
      84.1 cm x 59.4 cm
    • Kenny Germé The Godfather II, 2020 Hahnemühle FineArt Baryta 84.1 cm x 59.4 cm
      Kenny Germé
      The Godfather II, 2020
      Hahnemühle FineArt Baryta
      84.1 cm x 59.4 cm
    • Kenny Germé The Godfather III, 2020 Hahnemühle FineArt Baryta 84.1 cm x 59.4 cm
      Kenny Germé
      The Godfather III, 2020
      Hahnemühle FineArt Baryta
      84.1 cm x 59.4 cm
  • Lakin Ogunbanwo

    Lakin Ogunbanwo

    Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame, often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the African studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70s.

     

    Central to Ogunbanwo’s artistic investigation, is his desire to document the culture of Nigeria’s capital - Lagos, expand the contemporary African visual archive, and portray self-represented African narratives. He documents the complexity of his culture using veiled portraiture and fashion as a cultural signifier, and in doing so, counteracts the West’s monolithic gaze on Africa. 

    • Lakin Ogunbanwo I See it, Do You?, 2021 Giclee print 80 cm x 60 cm
      Lakin Ogunbanwo
      I See it, Do You?, 2021
      Giclee print
      80 cm x 60 cm
    • Lakin Ogunbanwo Self-Contained, 2021 Giclee print 119 cm x 79.5 cm
      Lakin Ogunbanwo
      Self-Contained, 2021
      Giclee print
      119 cm x 79.5 cm
    • Lakin Ogunbanwo Covid, for Where?, 2021 Giclee print 119 cm x 79.5 cm
      Lakin Ogunbanwo
      Covid, for Where?, 2021
      Giclee print
      119 cm x 79.5 cm
  • Maganga Mwagogo

    Maganga Mwagogo

    Maganga Mwagogo is a self-taught photographer based in Nairobi, Kenya and working around Africa. His work is chiefly interested in celebrating the achievements of African people and challenging the portrayal of African people by non African society. Maganga employs strong stances and vibrant colours in his imagery as a means to elevate his subjects to hero status and directly engage with the optimistic notion of a prosperous African society.


    In 2018, Mwagogo took part in To Revolutionary Type Love - a group exhibition celebrating love in the lives of the diverse Kenyan spectrum of the LGBTQIA. His work has been featured in publications including Vogue, Nataal, WIRED, ‘Not African Enough’, Architectural Digest, and Phaidon amongst others.

    • Maganga Mwagogo Wanasarakasi I, 2020 Giclee print on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 56.3 cm x 45 cm
      Maganga Mwagogo
      Wanasarakasi I, 2020
      Giclee print on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag
      56.3 cm x 45 cm
    • Maganga Mwagogo Wanasarakasi II, 2020 Giclee print on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 75 cm x 60 cm
      Maganga Mwagogo
      Wanasarakasi II, 2020
      Giclee print on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag
      75 cm x 60 cm
  • Marcus Maddox

    Marcus Maddox

    Marcus Maddox is a photographer living and working in Philadelphia, PA. His work is characterised by a natural tone, guided by intuition and empathy. He became interested in making images whilst growing up in Nashville, TN, getting his start by observing local musicians. Drawn towards the personal, Maddox sets out to capture the human condition in a meaningful and cinematic way. 

    Maddox's work has appeared in select publications including The New Yorker, NPR, American Chordata, Atmos Magazine, Wire Magazine, She Shreds Magazine, The FADER, New York Magazine, Philadelphia Magazine, The Independent Photographer, and The New York Times.

    • Marcus Maddox Amanda in her room with stained glass, 2020 Printed on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308 91.4 cm x 61 cm
      Marcus Maddox
      Amanda in her room with stained glass, 2020
      Printed on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308
      91.4 cm x 61 cm
    • Marcus Maddox April and Kelton, 2017 Printed on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308 91.4 cm x 61 cm
      Marcus Maddox
      April and Kelton, 2017
      Printed on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308
      91.4 cm x 61 cm
    • Marcus Maddox Ommahdi No. 2, 2018 Printed on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308 91.4 cm x 61 cm
      Marcus Maddox
      Ommahdi No. 2, 2018
      Printed on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308
      91.4 cm x 61 cm
  • Ngadi Smart

    Ngadi Smart

    Ngadi Smart is a Sierra Leonean Visual Artist and Designer based between London, U.K and Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.  Her practice consists of Illustration, Photography and Design. She also works as a Mixed Media artist, primarily in the form of collage art.

    In her photography, Sjmart's focus is documenting cultures, subcultures and intimacy. Her work often speaks on how people self-identify and choose to present themselves in front of the lens. Recently, she has also been interested in documenting Black sensuality and culture from an African point of view. She aims to showcase a myriad of representations of African people, and what it means to be African. Her photography has been published on CNN, British Journal of Photography, Vogue Italia, Atmos Magazine, and I.D Magazine.

     

    • Ngadi Smart Fashion Editorial | Atmos Magazine Vol 2, 2019 C Type Fuji Gloss paper 35 X 35 cm
      Ngadi Smart
      Fashion Editorial | Atmos Magazine Vol 2, 2019
      C Type Fuji Gloss paper
      35 X 35 cm
    • Ngadi Smart The Queen of Babi, 2020 C Type Fuji Gloss paper 43 cm x 29 cm
      Ngadi Smart
      The Queen of Babi, 2020
      C Type Fuji Gloss paper
      43 cm x 29 cm
  • Reece T. Williams

    Reece T. Williams

    Reece T. Williams is a New-York based photographer, writer, audio and video producer interested in telling stories about culture as expressed through traditions, rituals, and art forms. Williams was born in the Parkway Gardens section of Greenburgh, NY. The son of the folk taken from their homeland and brought to the Caribbean, and the American South, Williams is interested in photographing people, their histories, and their myriad expressions of culture. He loves talking to people about where they’re from, and what that means.

    For the piece, 'All Uprising Long' Williams states, “this photograph was made in 2020 amidst the global protest that followed the recorded murder of George Floyd. The title comes from a line in a piece written by the writer Danez Smith that appears in The Great Fire issue of Vanity Fair. The line really crystalized my own struggle throughout the year trying to understand why it was this time, and not before, when the world was set ablaze in response to the destruction of the Black body."

    • Reece T Williams A Harlem Love, 2017 Silver Gelatin Print on Fibre 20.32 cm x 25.4 cm
      Reece T Williams
      A Harlem Love, 2017
      Silver Gelatin Print on Fibre
      20.32 cm x 25.4 cm
    • Reece T Williams All Uprising Long, 2020 Silver Gelatin Print on Fibre 27.94 cm x 35.56 cm
      Reece T Williams
      All Uprising Long, 2020
      Silver Gelatin Print on Fibre
      27.94 cm x 35.56 cm
    • Reece T Williams Toye in USA, 2021 Silver Gelatin Print on Fibre 35.56 cm x 27.94 cm
      Reece T Williams
      Toye in USA, 2021
      Silver Gelatin Print on Fibre
      35.56 cm x 27.94 cm
  • Stephen Tayo

    Stephen Tayo

    Stephen Tayo is a Nigerian photographer based in Lagos. In his work, he documents the world around him, exploring the cultural landscape of Lagos and the role that fashion and style play in identity, community, culture, and religion. Tayo focuses his lens on the similingly mundane but remarkable moments of everyday life in his country — festivals, family celebrations, friendships, street life — and seeks to show the beauty in ordinary moments. His sitters are often active participants in the process; they perform for the camera and set the tone. Tayo is particularly influenced by the formal poses of studio portraiture in West Africa in the 1950s and 1960s, particularly the work of Seydou Keita, Malick Sidibe, and Samuel Fosso.

     

    Tayo studied philosophy at the University of Lagos. His work has been featured in Vogue US, British Vogue, New York Times, Indie Magazine, Dazed, Teen Vogue, Okay Africa, Vogue Italia, CNN, ArtNews, OkayAfrica, Highsnobiety, Vogue Australia, Hybebeast, Vice, Interview Magazine, among others.

    • Stephen Tayo IBEJI, 2019 Fine Art Paper 40.64 cm x 30.48 cm
      Stephen Tayo
      IBEJI, 2019
      Fine Art Paper
      40.64 cm x 30.48 cm
    • Stephen Tayo IBEJI 2, 2019 Fine Art Paper 40.6 cm x 30.5 cm
      Stephen Tayo
      IBEJI 2, 2019
      Fine Art Paper
      40.6 cm x 30.5 cm
  • Chosen Charity: Black Minds Matter UK

    Chosen Charity: Black Minds Matter UK

     

    "We are incredibly delighted to have been chosen for this very generous opportunity by the ever inspiring artist and curator, Aindrea Emelife. The BMMUK team want to give our gratitude to the Unit London platform for supporting our work.

    BMMUK is a charity that connects Black people with certified Black therapists for fully funded 12 week sessions of therapy. The donation from the Imagining Blackness exhibition will help us to provide free therapy sessions to those reaching out for therapy with BMMUK, therefore helping the Black community access the mental health support they need."

    - Agnes Mwakatuma, Founder of BMMUK